Fall Reading List

Fall 2014 Reading List

A new season calls for a new reading list.  Some of the books on here are more on the deeper side (like The Secret History by Donna Tartt), while others are rich with captivating plot lines (like Damage Control: Stories).  As usual, I’m sure there will be a couple of duds that won’t turn out to be as great as I thought, but I think it’s safe to say that the ten picks below are all worth a read.  If you’re looking for additional book recommendation, be sure to check out my Summer Reading List that had some awesome picks such as The Help by Kathryn Stockett and Tigers in Red Weather by Liza Kluassman.

 

Fall 2014 Reading List

  1. So We Read On:  How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures” by Maureen Corrigan – A book that delves into the inner secrets of The Great Gatsby.  The book sounds a little “nonfictioney,” but the comments/review have told a completely different story.
  2. The Paying Guests” by Sarah Waters – This book has incredible accolades and has been on just about any and all best-sellers list.  Entertainment Weekly calls it, “One of the year’s most engrossing and suspenseful novels…a love affair, a shocking murder, and a flawless ending … Will keep you sleepless for three nights straight and leave you grasping for another book that can sustain that high.”
  3. The Monogram Murders” by Sophie Hannah – I (embarrassingly) am a huge fan of the Hercule Poirot Series on Netflix.  The show was entirely inspired by Agatha Christie’s novels that were originally published decades ago.  The Monogram Murders is essentially the “next” book in the series that has been written by Sophie Hannah and approved for publication by the Christie society.  I know this is all really confusing, so just trust me on this one that the book will not disappoint.
  4. The Secret History” by Donna Tartt – I loved reading The Goldfinch (blogged here) over this past summer that was easily one of the best books I’ve read in awhile.  The Secret History was published before Tartt’s more well-known novel that is supposed to be as good – if not better – than her last.
  5. Damage Control: Stories” by Amber Dermont – A collection of short stories inspired by the privilege and entitlement of The Starboard Sea – a great book I finished just recently.  My advice would be to read The Starboard Sea first and then Damage Control: Stories as it’ll be easier to understand the overall story.
  6.  “The Secret Life of Violet Grant” by Beatriz Williams – A book about wealth, privilege, and family coverups.  It’s probably more of a beach read, but was too good to leave off the list until next year.
  7. This Side of Paradise” by F. Scott Fitzgerald – It’s a Fitzgerald classic that everyone (me included since it’s sitting on my nightstand) should read.
  8. Brideshead Revisited” by Evelyn Waugh – I’ve heard the book can be complex and a little heavy on the romance side, but the plot line sounds interesting.  If anyone has read this one before, please share your thoughts in the comment section below.
  9. Friendswood” by René Steinke – “A big, moving novel of one tight-knit Texas community and the events that alter its residents’ lives forever.”  #Sold
  10. Foul Trade” by B.K. Duncan – Another 1920s mystery to close off the list.

-Dean

Comments

  1. Jessie

    I read Brideshead Revisited over the summer and I loved it! It can be a little heavy on the romance portion in places, but its completely worth the read. It was by far one of my favorite books that I read this summer.

    • Dean

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Jessie. Hopefully I’ll be able to crack it open at some point and make my own conclusion.

      -Dean

    • Dean

      Glad to see I’m not the only Poirot fan. I’m actually a fan of just about an BBC show these days…like DOWNTON ABBEY.

      -Dean

  2. Christine

    I too loved Foul Trade. A gutsy heroine, lots of action and great detail about life in the 1920s. The subplot involving the theatre added a touch of glamour.

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